Searching for Lost Indians: An Archival Journey

5 Oct

During the late 1920s there were 5,000 of them in Newark, NY and Baltimore, MD alone, but who has ever heard of an Indian taxi?  Photos of these vehicles must exist in old family albums or are stacked in dusty drawers of historical societies, but the only ones I’ve discovered were in the archives of the Indian Motocycle Company in Springfield, MA. One reprinted photo appeared in the in-house promotional magazine, but all other references seem to have disappeared like an Apache covering his tracks. These, and others, are the lost Indians.

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Motorcycle Tourism Checklist for Lodging

30 Sep

Motorcycle Tourism Checklist for Lodging.

Motorcycle Tourism Checklist for Lodging

30 Sep

 

It’s a head count; bed count, and if your hotel, motel, inn, or resort isn’t booking at close to 100% capacity you probably are spending money on advertising to attract more clients.   Advertizing is a primary component of any marketing plan, but misdirected advertising is not only a waste of resources, it is also counterproductive.

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My specialty is developing motorcycle and food tourism, but the approach I’ve developed can be applied to any special interest niche—scuba diving, mountain biking, or any other.  Before developing any marketing plan, I advise clients to take an inventory of assets and to match them against potential markets.

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Moto-Foodie Meets Taste Trekkers

22 Sep

     Some will ride a hundred miles out of their way for a good meal.  At five in the morning with fog drifting across the big slab interstate highway I was dimly questioning whether or not  I should be one of them.  Taste Trekkers, the first conference for food tourism to be held in the United States, was taking place in Providence, Rhode Island and I was attempting to make it to the Providence Biltmore in time for the opening keynote address. 

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       Food tourism is finally being recognized for its economic importance and—like motorcycle tourism—is one of the fastest growing niche markets in a global industry.  For me the two go together since one has to travel to get to a foodie destination and when traveling one must stop to eat.  Food tourism is simply the flip side of motorcycle touring, but somehow very few people have recognized this symbiotic relationship.   

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     The opening address was by noted chef Matt Jennings, who has devoted himself to developing sustainable food networks.  His talk focused on community and paraphrased my old expression of voting with your wallet to that of voting with your fork.  Motorcyclists understand community and degrees of separation so it’s pointless to reiterate this new-found foodie wisdom.  It was after his presentation that the conference got down to “meat and potatoes” in a series of morning seminars.

     Taste the Terroir of American Honey was the first of my seminars.  It’s obvious when thought about: bees make honey from the nectar of different plants blooming at different times in different regions.  The honey produced during a Vermont spring is going to differ from that made during July or in Mississippi.  Since bees rarely venture more than three miles from a hive their honey is completely dependent upon terroir.  It’s also a food eaten completely raw and that doesn’t spoil, so understanding more about it seemed like a logical choice.

     Seminar tickets were issued and participants then had to trade them if they wanted to attend specific presentations.  Two of my three were traded, but the one I was reluctantly left with turned out to be equally interesting.  Tom Tew, a rum named after a famous Rhode Island pirate, is based on historically researched 18th century recipes and distilling processes.  Yo ho ho: from a foodie perspective, this rum ticked all the boxes.    The third was about an ice cider being produced in Vermont—and a bit more that included the Vermont Fresh Network and Black River Produce.  Since honey tasting, rum sampling, and pairing ice cider with food was very much a part of my morning activity, moving to the tasting pavilion was icing on the cake.

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     Imagine a ballroom filled with tables where New England chefs and food producers put out the best they had to offer.  Salads, cheeses, sushi, wines, beers, hard liquor, guacamole, charcuterie, and deserts made the tasting pavilion a real smorgasbord.  Certainly fun and filling, but also providing bit of education and certain presentations will impact my travel and tour-development plans for 2014.

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     Wrapping up with a panel discussion about food tourism in which more questions than answers were raised, left me feeling that Moto-Foodie had a unique approach that is worthy of further development.   However, in the end, I once again found myself back on the highway with two wheels heading north as the sun was setting and contemplating how this adventure would fit into my next.

Moto-Foodie in Milwaukee

17 Sep

 

I could dimly see through the blacked-out windows of the van as our driver rolled slowly down the narrow alley past a line of overflowing trash bins.  I could smell the river when we stopped at a non-descript doorway. This late in the evening the dim glow of the lamp mounted on the yellow brick wall barely illuminated the small bronze plaque that read, International Exports, Ltd. / 779 Front St. / Estab. 1968. Clad in a London Fog trench coat, our driver merely indicated the heavy door and we quickly stepped through into a small room. Two women barred our way and demanded the password. We had arrived at the Safe House.

This wasn’t London, nor was it a James Bond film, but it might as well have been. This was my first night in Milwaukee and while I could find people who admitted knowing about this long-established watering hole, not a soul would tell me more or divulge the password. Even our driver claimed that he wasn’t privy to it.

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However, it’s no secret that Milwaukee is a motorcycle-friendly town or that was once known as the “beer capital of the world.”  Most of us are on a first-name basis with Miller, Schlitz, Pabst, and Blatz, but the renaissance of craft beer and the amazing foodie scene in Wisconsin’s largest city were excuse enough to linger a couple of extra days before heading home. Continue reading

Best Western, Mid-Western Ride

10 Sep

On a dreary spring morning I received an email invitation to join a promotional tour that promised free food and three days of riding with other moto-journalists—so, without reluctance, my gear was packed and I flew to Kansas.  Two things motivated my decision to fly-and-ride: I needed a get-outta-town-free card and wanted to see what Best Western and Harley-Davidson were up to.

For decades there have been numerous small businesses that have welcomed motorcyclists, but seven years ago, Best Western Hotels and Harley-Davidson created the first corporate partnership that specifically promoted motorcycle tourism. Extremely successful with over 110,000 Harley owners in the Rider Rewards program it came as no surprise that they wanted to announce that this partnership has been extended for another three years.  However, Best Western had something else on their agenda.

Picking up my bike at Worth’s Harley-Davidson in Kansas City I followed what would become the group’s chase van to the KC Speedway Inn. Outside it looked like a nice Best Western property but inside it definitely was a boutique hotel.  The fact that the open, elegant bar was being thoroughly enjoyed by a group of riders merely added to the ambiance.  Aparently, not all Best Western hotels are created equal.

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Taking In The CROP

16 Aug

The gleaming copper glimpsed through the glass of a two-story atrium is the first thing that catches the eye.  Located on the Mountain Road in Stowe, this property was once known as The Shed Restaurant, the place where après ski was conceived, and long a favorite of mine for Sunday brunch.  One of Vermont’s original brewpubs, it was forced to close it’s doors in October 2011 when its lease expired.  This would be a tough act to follow.

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The Benzine Motorcycle: the first production motorcycle.

3 Aug

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It wasn’t just the illustration that caught my eye it also was the date of the newspaper –1896. The front page of the December 12th issue of the Scientific American was devoted to two illustrations of a sophisticated two-wheel vehicle that were identified as a “motor cycle using benzine.” My curiosity was piqued. Continue reading

Motor Bar & Restaurant: A Harley-Davidson Moto-Foodie Experience

31 Jul

The bar is graced by a replica board track racer.

The bar is graced by a replica board track racer.

Three days of riding and dining got us here.  We arrived on different flights, picked up our Harleys and met at the Kansas City Speedway Best Western Premier hotel.  Three days of riding and scrumptious dining as we crossed Missouri and rode north through Illinois.  However, all things must come to an end and, in the parking lot behind the Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Museum, the Motor Company reclaimed the bikes.  However, before we went our separate ways there was still one more dining experience to savor: the Motor Bar & Restaurant. Continue reading

Absinthe Cafe

29 Jul

Marble sculptures of fire hydrants topped with vegetables decorate corners along Wellington St. West in a neighborhood called Wellington Village. It’s an area in transition from a staid to hip, offers interesting private boutiques, a few specialty bars, nouveau-hippie stores, and reputedly great restaurants. One of these is the Absinthe Café.

The restaurant has a very unpretentious storefront with large windows facing the street, and the neat, but understated, décor is infused with great vibes. As a member of Savour Ottawa, the owners are committed to locally sourced ingredients and their community involvement includes donating a dollar to Cornerstone Housing for Women for each Benevolent Burger
sold.
Absinthe-exterior-72 Continue reading

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